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Patrick

BGM rectifier - iPhone charging

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On page two of the BGM rectifier fitting instructions:

 

DC (direct current): OUT with DC for charging the battery. With ignition systems capable of high power output, consumers can be fed directly without a battery used (e.g. Satnav systems, water pumps, rev counters, speedos and all sort of other toys).

 

http://www.lambrettaspares.com/pages/downloads/bgmreg.pdf

 

Question, has anyone used this functionality to charge an iPhone or other USB-based accessory? Wondering if that would actually work. Power source would be the BGM stator. If so, what would the wiring look like and is there any other components needed to do so?

 

Just conceptualizing future ideas, not troubleshooting anything.

 

Thanks Gals/Guys!

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Yep. I have the full BGM 12V electrical system, with a battery, and a fuse. I've wired a "cigarette lighter" socket into my glove box, and I currently have a USB charger plugged into it, which I've used for iPhone and iPod charging. Works well.

Not sure if your setup has a battery or not, but without a battery and a fuse, this could get dodgy. The battery acts as a capacitor in this scenario. Without a battery in the circuit, the power is coming only from the rectifier which is going to fluctuate greatly with engine revs...no telling what that would do to the charger or your phone. Prob nothing good. I'd also recommend a fuse for obvious reasons.

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Cool, good to know! Fuse for sure. I don't have a battery or a tray to add one.

Was looking at that "Mod Charger" as well but was thinking it could be redundant with the BGM rectifier. But maybe it would replace the power smoothing that a battery would provide? Anyone use one of those?

Thanks,

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Why not add a smaller 12v battery...? There are many smaller ones available that could be tucked out of site anywhere with or without the use of a battery tray.

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I'm running a lithium ion on my cut-down, it was Fíng expensive, but has enough cranking amps to start a 5 litre Range Rover. And although I know nothing about phone charging or battery technology there is a USB port on the afore mentioned battery? could this be a direct plug in point for your phone?

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That is intersting Skippy. Do you have a pic or link to the battery? If it's for a phone that would be cool.. I'd find it strange but cool.. Could it be for one of those "easy access" charging wires? Or I could be misunderatanding.

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Hmmm.  I think I must have missed the transition point where we went from talking about rectifiers and scooter batteries, to portable USB chargers for phones  :huh:

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To be honest Patrick did.

Separate battery technology was mentioned and Patrick asked for more info.

There are numerous charging solutions for phones.

The discussion morphed into lithium on post #4 and gathered momentum by the point Patrick asked for "more info please".

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Could just carry one of these:

http://www.ballisticparts.com/category.php?cPath=165

We got a demonstration for these at work and they are small enough to fit in your inside pocket and could probably charge your phone a lot of times before needing a recharge. Plus they have an extremely low discharge rate so if you don't put it on the charger for a year, it's not going to be much of an issue.

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I was under the impression that Skippy and others were talking about lithium batteries as they apply to motorcycles, and that Patrick was inquiring for more info about an alleged scooter battery that also had a direct plug for USB...which would be odd indeed, and I would love to see that too.

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Shit.. I'm sorry about that Ironhalo.. I was reading along and got caught up in the last thing I read.. Sorry to have gone off topic.

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Haha, no need for apologies my friend...it did sound like Skippy's post was talking about a cycle battery that had a USB port on it, although I think that was just a mixup? Not sure why anyone would make something like that.

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Patrick, how do you plan on using the rectifier in your setup? AC+DC? DC only? Batt/non-batt? What kind of headlight are you driving? Just curious.

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Current set up is non-battery AC, BGM stator, flywheel & rectifier. Halogen headlight 35W?, BGM LED taillight. I'm assuming I can go AC+DC using the BGM rectifier and skim some juice off the top in the form of DC to a charger or other like their info suggests but I don't want to assume. I'm aware my mileage will vary here (no pun intended) but really just curious if anyone has used the BGM rectifier in this manner or if I am just reading into this too much. Thanks,

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Gotcha. I ran my BGM setup as AC+DC for a bit, without a battery, and was able to run some LED lighting off of the DC circuit. I do know though, at low revs, the stator will be producing far less than optimal power...and without a battery in the mix, anything electronic (like the programmable DC flasher I have) will tend to spaz out. Until I installed a battery to keep the power more constant, the DC flasher would intermittently lose its settings, or just not work part of the time. It would go into a "frozen" state that required shutting off the power completely to revive it.

That said, you can certainly give a USB charger a shot without having a battery. Best case scenario, it just won't function at low revs, and will kick in at higher revs. Worst case scenario, it gets fried and fries whatever device is plugged into it (probably not too likely). Generally speaking it's too much power that causes permanent damage to electronics, not too little. But too little power definitely causes weird erratic behavior. If you decide to experiment, I'd say try it out with a super cheap USB charger and an old phone you don't care about?

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Thanks, that is pretty much what I am thinking about trying. More of an idea for longer rides to keep an iphone charged. I would be willing to use bluetooth accessories if I knew I could keep the phone charged. If it loses charging at low RPM, shouldn't be a problem unless it freaks out like you said. I'll try it out with an old phone and let you know. Thanks,

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I have this: http://junopower.com/collections/automobile/products/jumpr-cars-best-friend-jumpstart-cars-on-the-go

 

Successfully jumpstarted cars a few times with it.

Could just carry one of these:

http://www.ballisticparts.com/category.php?cPath=165

We got a demonstration for these at work and they are small enough to fit in your inside pocket and could probably charge your phone a lot of times before needing a recharge. Plus they have an extremely low discharge rate so if you don't put it on the charger for a year, it's not going to be much of an issue.

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Gotcha. I ran my BGM setup as AC+DC for a bit, without a battery, and was able to run some LED lighting off of the DC circuit. I do know though, at low revs, the stator will be producing far less than optimal power...and without a battery in the mix, anything electronic (like the programmable DC flasher I have) will tend to spaz out. Until I installed a battery to keep the power more constant, the DC flasher would intermittently lose its settings, or just not work part of the time. It would go into a "frozen" state that required shutting off the power completely to revive it.

That said, you can certainly give a USB charger a shot without having a battery. Best case scenario, it just won't function at low revs, and will kick in at higher revs. Worst case scenario, it gets fried and fries whatever device is plugged into it (probably not too likely). Generally speaking it's too much power that causes permanent damage to electronics, not too little. But too little power definitely causes weird erratic behavior. If you decide to experiment, I'd say try it out with a super cheap USB charger and an old phone you don't care about?

 

 

I have the BGM regulator on my 6V AC scoot.  It just has a big Zener diode in it and maybe a Capacitor or something, so I wouldn't think you would fry anything (same for the 12V one).  You can buy a big capacitor and your own zener to make sure that nothing gets fried if you wanted to do something you KNOW would protect your phone.  However, if you don't have a battery, this could cause dimmer lights.  An iphone charges between .5 amp and an amp, so it might drag on your system.  

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